Intelligence sharing is important in the fight against Cybercrime

Intelligence sharing is important in the fight against Cybercrime

Table of Contents
According to Blueliv, malware types that were previously concentrated on the financial industry are now successfully assaulting non-banking targets. In the battle against cybercrime, greater coordination and intelligence sharing between companies are becoming increasingly important. Intelligence sharing As cybercrime's "public profile" grows, businesses are encouraged to consider how they can keep their businesses and consumers safe by sharing intelligence, best practices, and defense mechanisms. What is threat intelligence, and how does it work? Threat intelligence is evidence-based knowledge about existing or new cyber threats, including contexts, methods, indicators, implications, and actionable advice, that may be utilized to comprehend the dangers that have, will, or are presently attacking an organization. Threat intelligence's main goal is to help organizations understand the dangers of the most prevalent and serious external threats, including zero-day threats, advanced persistent threats, and exploits, so they may make informed decisions about how to respond to those attacks. Inter-agency collaboration and intelligence sharing when fighting cyber crimes go beyond IP addresses, hashes, and other threat data to provide crucial contexts around a threat activity, such as indicators of compromise (IoC), indicators of attack (IoA), tactics used, and, perhaps, the adversary's intent and identity. Threat information can aid in the analysis of risks, resource allocation, and understanding of threats specific to a company's industry and territory. This data could include the following:
  • An attack's mechanisms
  • How will you know if you're being attacked?
  • The impact of many forms of attacks on an organization
  • Advice about how to fight against attacks that is actionable.
One source of threat intelligence, from this perspective, is the organization's internal networks and systems. Another factor is a large amount of information available outside, such as data collected by honeypots, spam traps, malware-detecting web crawlers, and the monitoring of hacking forums. What sorts of threat intelligence are there? Threat intelligence is compiled by gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources concerning emerging or existing threat actors and threats. Risk intelligence comes in an expansion of forms, starting from excessive-level, non-technical statistics to technical details on individual threats. Threat intelligence can be divided into four categories: The big picture of past, current, and future trends in the threat landscape is strategic threat intelligence. Strategic threat intelligence is a high-level analysis that is usually reserved for non-technical audiences like stakeholders and board members. It usually includes subjects like security scores and the potential consequences of a business choice in this way. Risks connected with specific lines of action, broad patterns in threat actor tactics and targets, and geopolitical events and trends are all areas where good strategic threat intelligence may help. The most difficult type of intelligence to accumulate is strategic threat intelligence. It necessitates human data gathering and analysis, which necessitates a thorough awareness of both cybersecurity and the complexities of global geopolitical situations. Tactical threat intelligence - Threat actors' techniques, tools, and strategies Tactical threat information is concerned with the immediate future and aids security teams in determining if current security programs will be effective in detecting and reducing specific hazards. Tactical threat intelligence is the most straightforward to gather and is almost always automated. As a result, it can be found in open source and free threat intelligence feeds, but it has a short shelf life because IoCs like malicious IP addresses or domain names can become obsolete in days or even hours. Threat intelligence for operational use - Details on the nature and purpose of threats and actors. Operational threat intelligence examines the facts of previously known attacks that have been identified by tactical information to answer the questions "who?" "what?" "and how?" It's best for security operations centers (SOCs), which are in charge of day-to-day security activities. Vulnerability management, incident response, and threat monitoring are among the most frequent users of operational threat information because it helps them do their assigned tasks more efficiently. Technical threat intelligence — Indicators of malware and campaign technicality (from shared threat intelligence feeds) Technical threat intelligence focuses on particular technical indicators linked to the tools and infrastructure used by threat actors. Threat intelligence feeds from vendors and intelligence-sharing communities are the most popular sources of technical threat intelligence. Because technical threat intelligence is abundant and has a short useable lifespan, technical indications should be fed automatically into security systems such as firewalls and content filters to maximize their utility. Threat intelligence gathered through technical means should not be used in isolation. What are the benefits of sharing threat intelligence? Given the likelihood that threat actors would act and behave in similar ways, it is becoming increasingly necessary for organizations to share threat intelligence and learn from the community's experience in order to improve their security posture. Sharing threat intelligence enables the installation of suitable security measures in a timely manner. With detailed and contextualized threat intelligence, organizations can better anticipate attacker strategies, identify malicious activities, and thwart assaults. Collaboration and mutually beneficial connections. Threat intelligence sharing can help to create reciprocal connections and trust, which can lead to increased collaboration. Context and point of view. Different people hold different viewpoints. Threat information sharing can result in a wide range of fascinating and different results from people in the community and industry. Elimination of bias affects everyone, and it can lead to overconfidence or overoptimism while making decisions. Sharing threat intelligence can aid in the discovery of blind spots. Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on linkedin LinkedIn